Poverty is inherited and maintains young people stemming from disadvantaged backgrounds trapped in poverty, according to a new Caritas study conducted in the Czech Republic.

It found that the most common poverty-related situations that Czech youth are facing are indebtedness and homelessness.

The study also found that young single mothers are especially affected by indebtedness related poverty. As much as one third of the mothers has difficulty making ends meet and some 56% of has at least one loan or another type of debt. Regarding homelessness, some 68,500 people are homeless in Czech Republic today, and some 119,000 being at risk of losing their homes.

“No one is responsible for the socio-economic situation of the family into which one is born,” said said Lukáš Curylo, director of Caritas Czech Republic. “Therefore, everyone should receive proper help to overcome this struggle. Caritas Czech Republic is playing this role. It helps individuals to recover their dignity and self-sufficiency. It also advocates a fair societal model that enables excluded people to integrate society and develop their full potential.”

The Czech study, conducted by Caritas Czech Republic’s Research Team, is part of a wider European comparative study that Caritas Europa as coordinated in 16 European countries and that will be presented next month.

The overall findings of the 16 studies suggest poverty is still hampering many young people from fully integrate and contribute to their society.

“Addressing youth poverty should be a priority for decision makers. Young people are our future, so we have to give them opportunities in the present. Their situation has deep implications for the future of Europe’s social cohesion, social models and social protection systems,” said Jorge Nuño Mayer, Secretary General of Caritas Europa.