French President Emmanuel Macron, who received the Charlemagne Prize for European Unity in the German city of Aachen on May 10, was honoured for his “his vision of a new Europe”. According to the findings of a new survey, a majority of Germans back his vision, though many think his ideas may go a little too far.

Published on May 9, the survey, in which 1,007 Germans were interviewed by phone earlier in the week, showed a majority rejects the French president’s plans for deepening EU economic and financial cooperation, proposals many German politicians also oppose.

As reported by Deutsche Welle (DW), Germany’s international broadcaster, Macron, 40, has suggested that EU countries deepen their defence and tax cooperation and strengthen EU institutions. He has also called for “democratic conventions” and the introduction of transnational lists for the European Parliament.

As regards the economy, Macron has suggested the 19 EU member countries that use the euro as their currency agree to create a common finance minister, budget and parliament and introduce joint borrowing by member states.

Since entering office one year ago, Macron has unabashedly pushed for European cohesion and EU reform.